divorce_hazards-2

In 2005, divorced households in the United States spent as much as 56 per cent more on electricity and water per person than married households and used up to 61 per cent more resources per person than they did before the separation took place.
more than 73 billion kilowatt hours of electricity and 627 billion gallons of water could have been saved in the US.

In the United States, the proportion of divorced households jumped from five percent in 1970 to 15 percent in 2000, and numbers have surged even in China where divorce has not been traditionally as common, the study said.

In 2005, US divorced households spent as much as 56 percent more on electricity and water per person than married households, and used up to 61 percent more resources per person than they did before the separation took place.

If divorced households operated with an efficiency similar to married households, “more than 73 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity and 627 billion gallons of water could have been saved in the US,” it said.

Researchers surveyed 3,283 homes in the United States between 2001 and 2005, and found that divorcing households registered a 61 percent increase in the number of rooms per person, compared with six percent increase in households that remained married.
12/3/2007 7:36 PM
90% of men kiss their wife goodbye when they leave the house.
The rest kiss their house goodbye when they leave the wife.
Now they can make the best of a bad marriage in the name of being environmentally friendly.
Scientists have quantified for the first time the extent to which divorce damages the environment. The researchers found that the combined use of electricity across the two new households created rose 53% while water use was up by 42%.
Across America – one of 12 countries studied – divorced households used 73 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity in 2005 that could have been saved if the families had not split up. That is equivalent to about a fifth of Britain’s consumption.
Broken couples also increase demand for housebuilding and infrastructure such as new roads. “The global trend of soaring divorce rates has created more households with fewer people, has taken up more space and has gobbled up more energy and water,” said Jianguo Liu of Michigan University, who carried out the latest research.
The study, to be published tomorrow in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the average number of rooms per household was between 33% and 95% higher for divorced couples than for married ones.
Liu also calculated that America now has an extra 38.5m rooms in houses and apartments built to meet the demand for more accommodation generated by divorce over the past three decades.
The growth of single-person households is also damaging the environment. Research published in the journal Environment, Development and Sustainability found that:
– One-person households are the biggest consumers of energy, land and household goods, such as washing machines, refrigerators, TVs and stereos, per capita
– They consume 38% more products, 42% more packaging, 55% more electricity and 61% more gas per capita than four-person households
– People living alone create 1½ tons of waste annually compared with a ton by those in households of four or more.

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